Not so long ago we were writing about lowest temperature ever recorded in nature. At that time the record was is -89.2 ° C (-188.6 ° F, 184.0 K), which was measured at the Russian Vostok station in Antarctica on July 21, 1983.
New lowest temperature on Earth!
However, that’s no longer… Read more

Not so long ago we were writing about lowest temperature ever recorded in nature. At that time the record was is -89.2 ° C (-188.6 ° F, 184.0 K), which was measured at the Russian Vostok station in Antarctica on July 21, 1983.

New lowest temperature on Earth!

However, that’s no longer the case. As of June 25, 2018, officially the lowest ever recorded temperature is -98°C (-144.4 °F, 175.15 K)! Such a low temperature was discovered by analyzing data collected by satellites monitoring the temperature in a series of valleys on a top of Antarctica’s ice sheet.

According to the scientist who made the discovery, that’s close to the lowest possible temperature attainable on the Earth surface. The temperature can drop a little lower, setting a new record, but it won’t ever be a dramatic difference. This is further proven by the fact, that even though the temperature was checked for a few different places, often separated by hundreds of kilometers, the lowest readings were always the same.

The lowest temperature in the world is almost -100°C!

To reach such a low temperature a few conditions needs to be met. Aside from more obvious requirements like clear skies and light winds; less obvious is the fact, that an extremely dry air is necessary. Why? Because water vapor trapped in the air can easily block the heat loss from the snow surface, causing the cooling to be slower. Not only that, but those conditions need to persist for several days in the row in order for the air to cool for such extreme temperature. Another factor that makes reaching such low temperature is the fact, that it was observed in tiny valleys, where the cold air could descend and remain for days, which allows it to cool considerably.